Category: Communism

The second Sunday of every month is Sports Day in North Korea,…

The second Sunday of every month is Sports Day in North Korea, with the first one of the year falling on Kim Jong Un’s January 8 birthday. Group running, mass rhythmic exercises, and other colorful sports activities were held throughout the country.

The computerized control room of Huichon Power Station No. 2….

The computerized control room of Huichon Power Station No. 2. The largest damn in North Korea, it has recently established an integrated control system to manage water and organize power production in the most efficient way possible.

A waitress at the Sinpyong Rest Area along the Pyongyang-Wonsan…

A waitress at the Sinpyong Rest Area along the Pyongyang-Wonsan Tourist Motorway.

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Vintage photo of the Korean Film Studio on set outside of…

Vintage photo of the Korean Film Studio on set outside of Pyongyang in the 90s.

An evening gala of working people, students, and youth took…

An evening gala of working people, students, and youth took place in Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Kim Jong Il’s election as general secrety of the Workers’ Party of Korea.

A mass rally and march of over 100,000 thousand students,…

A mass rally and march of over 100,000 thousand students, workers, and citizens of Pyongyang was held to protest US President Trump’s speech declaring that he would “totally destroy” North Korea.

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Traffic congestion in Pyongyang lessens as gasoline prices skyrocket

While the United Nations is contemplating the suspension of oil supply to North Korea following the country’s latest nuclear test, the price of gasoline in Pyongyang has soared and the shortage of fuel continues, leading to a considerable reduction in the number of cars on the streets of the North Korean capital.

According to the Seoul-Pyongyang News, reliable sources have conveyed on September 6 that the gasoline price in Pyongyang increased from $27 per liter to $30 per liter last month and doubled recently. The same sources also revealed that as the supply to the city’s gas stations rapidly declined North Korean drivers had to roam around the town for fuel. Some stations, they said, even asked for an extra payment on the quiet.

Nonetheless, one bright side to the fuel shortage is that it has reduced the traffic congestion in downtown Pyongyang as the number of cars on the streets has diminished.

Following the nuclear test, the city of Pyongyang looks tranquil on the surface. However, North Koreans are slowly becoming aware of the inconvenience created by the international sanctions as the reduced traffic started to disrupt their livelihoods.

There are currently more than two thousand taxicabs in Pyongyang. Since the first half of 2014, the North Korean taxis have operated on double shifts, alternating the work shift depending on whether their license plate ends in an even or odd number.

Many experts expect that if the suspension of the fuel supply is prolonged and its impact spreads to the countryside, it would disrupt the transport of goods within the country and thereby lead to a gradual increase in prices.

Taen Heavy Machine Complex engineers inspecting generating…

Taen Heavy Machine Complex engineers inspecting generating equipment for the Tanchon Power Station which is currently under construction in South Hamgyong province.